memory
memory
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thisistheverge:

Play this: ‘Super Planet Crash’ tests your god mode Sometimes, it’s easy to forget what a serendipitous marvel our universe really is. At least, until you’ve tried building your own. Super Planet Crash is a browser-based simulation that requires players to forge a planetary system capable of surviving at least 500 years. The interface is simple: left-click to place up to 11 astronomical objects of varying sizes anywhere within the defined limits. What makes it challenging is how the gravitational field of each celestial body affects others around it. Even a single dwarf star can throw everything out of orbit.

also try: Galaxy Crash (Java Applet)
http://burro.cwru.edu/JavaLab/GalCrashWeb/main.html
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Q: Do you know of any good middle eastern music?
Asked by jasonleebasora
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alyibnawi:



Morocco
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speaktruthh:

t1gereye:

islamic architecture

95% sure this is in morocco
why we perfect? idk.
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samwanda:

chumloadio:

Lana Turner

♥ ♥ ♥
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The archaeologist of African vinyl
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zerostatereflex:

Water Experiment No. 33 Automata
What a beautiful work of craftsmanship.
By: Dean O’Callaghan


zerostatereflex:

Water Experiment No. 33 Automata
What a beautiful work of craftsmanship.
By: Dean O’Callaghan
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marhaba-maroc-algerie-tunisie:

Morocco
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vwillas8:

Muttrah Muscat Oman 2011 by ~ilawar on Flickr.
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everythingcentralasia:

The Gur-e Amir (Persian: گورِ امیر, translating to “tomb of the king”‎), is a mausoleum of the Asian conqueror Tamerlane (also known as Timur) as well as his sons Shah Rukh and Miran Shah and grandson Ulugh Beg. This architectural complex with its azure dome is located in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Gur-e Amir is seeped in both rich architecture and legend. It occupies an important place in the history of Turkic-Persian Architecture as the precursor and model for later great Mughal architecture tombs, including Humayun’s Tomb in Delhi and the Taj Mahal in Agra. The Persian style building features a single turquoise copula, ribbed and detailed with an ornate rosette pattern. The dome tops a octagonally shaped building that is also highly detailed with ornamental mosaics and epigraphs. Its construction began in 1403 after the death of Timur’s beloved grandson Ulugh Beg. Now the question is, is Timur really buried in this mausoleum? In 1941, the tomb was unsealed to verify the remains as Timur’s. The excavation was successful in the sense that the skeleton’s damage matched descriptions of the injuries Timur incurred in battle that caused his death and confirmed that the remains are indeed his.
x x
everythingcentralasia:

The Gur-e Amir (Persian: گورِ امیر, translating to “tomb of the king”‎), is a mausoleum of the Asian conqueror Tamerlane (also known as Timur) as well as his sons Shah Rukh and Miran Shah and grandson Ulugh Beg. This architectural complex with its azure dome is located in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Gur-e Amir is seeped in both rich architecture and legend. It occupies an important place in the history of Turkic-Persian Architecture as the precursor and model for later great Mughal architecture tombs, including Humayun’s Tomb in Delhi and the Taj Mahal in Agra. The Persian style building features a single turquoise copula, ribbed and detailed with an ornate rosette pattern. The dome tops a octagonally shaped building that is also highly detailed with ornamental mosaics and epigraphs. Its construction began in 1403 after the death of Timur’s beloved grandson Ulugh Beg. Now the question is, is Timur really buried in this mausoleum? In 1941, the tomb was unsealed to verify the remains as Timur’s. The excavation was successful in the sense that the skeleton’s damage matched descriptions of the injuries Timur incurred in battle that caused his death and confirmed that the remains are indeed his.
x x
everythingcentralasia:

The Gur-e Amir (Persian: گورِ امیر, translating to “tomb of the king”‎), is a mausoleum of the Asian conqueror Tamerlane (also known as Timur) as well as his sons Shah Rukh and Miran Shah and grandson Ulugh Beg. This architectural complex with its azure dome is located in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Gur-e Amir is seeped in both rich architecture and legend. It occupies an important place in the history of Turkic-Persian Architecture as the precursor and model for later great Mughal architecture tombs, including Humayun’s Tomb in Delhi and the Taj Mahal in Agra. The Persian style building features a single turquoise copula, ribbed and detailed with an ornate rosette pattern. The dome tops a octagonally shaped building that is also highly detailed with ornamental mosaics and epigraphs. Its construction began in 1403 after the death of Timur’s beloved grandson Ulugh Beg. Now the question is, is Timur really buried in this mausoleum? In 1941, the tomb was unsealed to verify the remains as Timur’s. The excavation was successful in the sense that the skeleton’s damage matched descriptions of the injuries Timur incurred in battle that caused his death and confirmed that the remains are indeed his.
x x
everythingcentralasia:

The Gur-e Amir (Persian: گورِ امیر, translating to “tomb of the king”‎), is a mausoleum of the Asian conqueror Tamerlane (also known as Timur) as well as his sons Shah Rukh and Miran Shah and grandson Ulugh Beg. This architectural complex with its azure dome is located in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Gur-e Amir is seeped in both rich architecture and legend. It occupies an important place in the history of Turkic-Persian Architecture as the precursor and model for later great Mughal architecture tombs, including Humayun’s Tomb in Delhi and the Taj Mahal in Agra. The Persian style building features a single turquoise copula, ribbed and detailed with an ornate rosette pattern. The dome tops a octagonally shaped building that is also highly detailed with ornamental mosaics and epigraphs. Its construction began in 1403 after the death of Timur’s beloved grandson Ulugh Beg. Now the question is, is Timur really buried in this mausoleum? In 1941, the tomb was unsealed to verify the remains as Timur’s. The excavation was successful in the sense that the skeleton’s damage matched descriptions of the injuries Timur incurred in battle that caused his death and confirmed that the remains are indeed his.
x x
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everythingcentralasia:

Shah-i-Zinda (Uzbek: Shohizinda; Persian: شاه زنده‎, meaning “the living king”) is a necropolis in the north-eastern part of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Shah-i-Zinda ensemble includes mausoleums and other ritual buildings of 9-14th and 19th centuries. Shah-i-Zinda was formed over nine centuries (from 11th to 19th) and now includes more than 20 buildings. Like most other monumental structures in Samarkand Shah-i-Zinda’s architectural style is also Timurid. The name Shah-i-Zinda is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet of Muhammed was buried there. He came to Samarkand with the Arabian invasion in the 7th century. Popular legends speak that he was beheaded for his faith, but he took his head and went into a deep well (Garden of Paradise) where he is still living now. x
everythingcentralasia:

Shah-i-Zinda (Uzbek: Shohizinda; Persian: شاه زنده‎, meaning “the living king”) is a necropolis in the north-eastern part of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Shah-i-Zinda ensemble includes mausoleums and other ritual buildings of 9-14th and 19th centuries. Shah-i-Zinda was formed over nine centuries (from 11th to 19th) and now includes more than 20 buildings. Like most other monumental structures in Samarkand Shah-i-Zinda’s architectural style is also Timurid. The name Shah-i-Zinda is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet of Muhammed was buried there. He came to Samarkand with the Arabian invasion in the 7th century. Popular legends speak that he was beheaded for his faith, but he took his head and went into a deep well (Garden of Paradise) where he is still living now. x
everythingcentralasia:

Shah-i-Zinda (Uzbek: Shohizinda; Persian: شاه زنده‎, meaning “the living king”) is a necropolis in the north-eastern part of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Shah-i-Zinda ensemble includes mausoleums and other ritual buildings of 9-14th and 19th centuries. Shah-i-Zinda was formed over nine centuries (from 11th to 19th) and now includes more than 20 buildings. Like most other monumental structures in Samarkand Shah-i-Zinda’s architectural style is also Timurid. The name Shah-i-Zinda is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet of Muhammed was buried there. He came to Samarkand with the Arabian invasion in the 7th century. Popular legends speak that he was beheaded for his faith, but he took his head and went into a deep well (Garden of Paradise) where he is still living now. x
everythingcentralasia:

Shah-i-Zinda (Uzbek: Shohizinda; Persian: شاه زنده‎, meaning “the living king”) is a necropolis in the north-eastern part of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Shah-i-Zinda ensemble includes mausoleums and other ritual buildings of 9-14th and 19th centuries. Shah-i-Zinda was formed over nine centuries (from 11th to 19th) and now includes more than 20 buildings. Like most other monumental structures in Samarkand Shah-i-Zinda’s architectural style is also Timurid. The name Shah-i-Zinda is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet of Muhammed was buried there. He came to Samarkand with the Arabian invasion in the 7th century. Popular legends speak that he was beheaded for his faith, but he took his head and went into a deep well (Garden of Paradise) where he is still living now. x
everythingcentralasia:

Shah-i-Zinda (Uzbek: Shohizinda; Persian: شاه زنده‎, meaning “the living king”) is a necropolis in the north-eastern part of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Shah-i-Zinda ensemble includes mausoleums and other ritual buildings of 9-14th and 19th centuries. Shah-i-Zinda was formed over nine centuries (from 11th to 19th) and now includes more than 20 buildings. Like most other monumental structures in Samarkand Shah-i-Zinda’s architectural style is also Timurid. The name Shah-i-Zinda is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet of Muhammed was buried there. He came to Samarkand with the Arabian invasion in the 7th century. Popular legends speak that he was beheaded for his faith, but he took his head and went into a deep well (Garden of Paradise) where he is still living now. x